shotgun reloading ?

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by jayson, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. jayson

    jayson New Member

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    I just started reloading handgun rounds a year ago and LOVE it. Looking at the shotgun setups but they make about as much sense to me as a progressive press did over a year ago lol

    Not a big slug shooter but would like to be able to load them, mostly want buck shot.

    can slugs and shot be loaded on same setup?

    Is it still cheaper to load with not being able to reuse cases?
    I mean shot shells are pretty cheap, hard to beat walmart sometimes lol

    any help would be great guy !!! thanks a lot !!
     
  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Not a reloader yet...so not really sure about the shotgun hulls and how many times you can reload them...

    Post a pic of your home reloading setup...I, for one, would like to see it !
     

  3. jayson

    jayson New Member

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    its a work in progress lol
     

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  4. Teddybear

    Teddybear New Member

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    You can probably get 3-5 loadings per hull. However, with the price of shot, primers and wads, your not going to save any $$$. Its just as cost effective to by shot shells.

    Just my 2 cents worth.
     
  5. jayson

    jayson New Member

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    Thats what I figured for bird shot as its so cheap but what about buck shot? Thats mostly what I use a lot of for groundhog lol
     
  6. Teddybear

    Teddybear New Member

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    Cant help ya there. Ive never loaded buck shot.
     
  7. SeventiesWreckers

    SeventiesWreckers Load Bearing Wall

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    If your looking at reloading shotgun hulls back to what you just fired out of them, and you were shooting something like #6-#8 shot, it's likely going to be a minimum cost savings, or a push. Reloading to save money would probably work better if we didn't just turn around and go right out & shoot up what we just reloaded. Which is what I do, and what most of my friends do. We just end up shooting more, and don't really save that much money, we just spend a little less doing it that way.

    There are advantages to knowing how to reload for the shotgun. Most of the loads I like to shoot are hardly ever on sale, and it is more cost effective for me to reload. I tend to pick up the hulls that other shooters leave on the ground, as long as they are high brass, so I have a pretty good source of free, once fired hulls. My old Winchester's like high brass shells, and I never have feed jams with it. They're not to partial to low brass though, so I don't bother with it. So a supply of free hulls makes the cost look a bit better anyway.

    My Grandfather started me reloading scatter gun shells when I was about 11. It was a smart move on his part. The process is basic, and is the easiest way to learn, or teach someone (like a 11 year old), basic reloading principals, and good workbench habits. The hulls are big, easy to handle, & inspect for cracks, splits, & damages that would grade them as rejects. And, since I didn't have a big bench area, I'd only do a few at a time, moving them step by step through the whole process, double checking along the way of course. The biggest benefit I got out of it, was the perception that I had now elevated my stature. I could make my own ammunition now, and for a 11year old, that seemed like a pretty big advancement. I still reload the same way, small batches, step by step, and I've managed to avoid any problems that way. Which is a good thing.

    Since there seem to be more people than ever anticipating an impending time, where life as we know it ceases to exist, knowing how to reload for the shotgun might be a skill worth having. They will probably be tied with black powder as the last firearms in common usage. Just something to ponder.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2012