Stovepipe Jam

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by threetango, Dec 22, 2014.

  1. threetango

    threetango Moderator Moderator

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  2. RibEye

    RibEye Steak Medium Rare

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    Glock 17 - ????
     

  3. CallMaker

    CallMaker Guest

    "the magazine spring that ejects the old cartridge is too weak"

    I'm confused:confused:

    I have never heard of the magazine spring being involved in the extraction/ejection of the spent cartridge case.

    Looks like another "internet expert" on the loose.
     
  4. threetango

    threetango Moderator Moderator

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    Didn't read anything about a mag spring ???
    Where did you find that statement , I couldn't find it in the article, only about the ejector spring. :confused:

    Help me out here my eyes ain't that great. :D


    Is this what you're referring too.


    Bad ejection mechanism: Either the return spring of the slide may be too strong or the ejector spring that ejects the old cartridge is too weak. In either case, the slide moves back and then gets pushed forward and starts to close before the old case is ejected. Therefore, the old case gets caught before it has a chance to fully leave the firearm.
     
  5. CallMaker

    CallMaker Guest

    Hi 3T.

    Well it's as you say now but what I posted was a direct copy/paste from the original article. I fear that demons have been at work.

    But in any case the "ejector" does not have a spring, there may be exceptions but I am unaware of them. The "ejector" is a fixed piece of metal that serves to eject the empty casing from the pistol. What he should be refering to is the "extractor" spring on some pistols. Or as in the original 1911 design the "extractor" has no spring as it is a controlled round type of feed. If the "stove pipe" is caused by a mechanical malfunction it is more often related to diminished slide velocity which can be caused by several things. Or, possibly defective/worn "extractor".

    Other causes of the classic "stove pipe" are generally related to factors other than mechanical problems with the pistol itself. Such as; operator technique, ammunition, or firearm cleanliness.
     
  6. arcee72

    arcee72 New Member

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    I haven't, personally, seen a stovepipe stoppage in more than 30 years because I now shoot nothing but factory ammo. Back then, I had a Colt Gold Cup with two different sets of recoil springs - heavy and light. When I was shooting light target loads, I used the light springs. When I was shooting hardball or hollow points, I used the heavy (double) spring. I had my own reloading bench, and I used to cast my own 190gr. SWC bullets for target shooting. Once, I forgot to change the spring before going to the range to shoot target loads, and I saw a whole bunch of stovepipes. :eek: